Mourning and Openness

I have not published on this Blog for a while…I have started again leading off with some personal comments.

While one never gets over a loss…. I found that when my wife of forty-seven years died of ovarian cancer I was, for the first two years after, in a different place…I both knew that she had died and simultaneously didn’t know. I survived the first year by writing poems to her…which I called Talking to Julia…. that helped me cope the immediacy of her passing…. but one, as mentioned, never gets over it…one’s love just grows deeper. After her death, I … Continue Reading »

Democracy, Bullying and Homosexuality

Although it has been a while since my last blog article on democracy (January 2009) I would like to continue my thoughts about democracy in America and talk about it in relation to some recent events connected with a homosexual life choice. Condemnation of a homosexual life style is, as we all know, still evident in our American culture. I am not only talking about some thugs in the Bronx who have attacked gay young people, nor the invasion of privacy that caused a young college student to commit suicide. Besides such obvious examples of prejudice I would like to … Continue Reading »

Narcissism and Immortality

As all of us know there are many deaths that befall us in our lifetime — the most permanent, as far as we can tell, being our physical death. So wounding is the loss of someone we love, so painful as we rest him or her back into mother earth, that it overshadows other seemingly less absolute deaths that cross our paths. To have one’s reputation subject to slur and innuendo is a loss, to forgo the presence of former friends, – usually because of small but hurtful misunder-standings is even characterized as a death of a friendship. Obviously to … Continue Reading »

What Makes Democracy Work

When I was a young man, I recall President Truman saying that we lived in a Christian nation – a remark that was not greeted with much acceptance. Unfortunately, such a sentiment is not just of historical interest. We are witness, today, as we know, to the growth of fundamentalism, what I would classify as a totalitarian consciousness, in both religious denominations and political ideologies. Consequently, I think it is legitimate to ask: Can one speak of a democracy and in the same breath speak of any nation as being Christian, Islamic, or Jewish? Do religious or ethnic identifications go … Continue Reading »

Childhood Illness and Parental Anxiety

One of the most difficult things to handle is one’s child’s illness; particularly illnesses that may have a long duration, for example, serious allergies or juvenile diabetes. No matter what medical assurances parents may receive, they frequently are concerned that, somehow, they may have contributed to, or, could contribute or aggravate their child’s condition. This is particularly evident, for example, in the case of allergies to peanuts where one mistake could result in a fatal response. It is understandable that parents experience extreme, sometimes debilitating anxiety. Clearly one of the most painful things a parent can go through is the death of a child; to … Continue Reading »

Listening To Van Gogh

Recently the Bank of America sponsored a viewing of Van Gogh’s art at the new wing of The Museum of Modern Art, in New York City. This  commentary, written in response to a a similar exhibit a few years ago at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, has, I believe, relevance for viewing and responding to this great artist’s work. I would like your comments, if you care to share them.

thanks, Jerry Gargiulo

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is getting more crowded these days. Is it the good exhibits, i.e. the Russian Impressionists collection, collection from the Holy Land, the Van Gogh … Continue Reading »

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